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Andrew R. Reeves, Ph.D.

Patent Agent

Dr. Andrew Reeves, a patent agent at Johnson, Marcou, Isaacs & Nix, LLC (JMIN), has significant experience helping companies generate, manage, and protect intellectual property assets. He specializes in biotechnology and has experience with patent prosecution in technology areas including metabolic and genetic engineering of industrially-important microorganisms; integrated chemical processes for solvent and polymer production; simulated moving bed chromatography for separation and purification of natural products; biomedical and bioanalytical devices; and optical probing of precancerous cells based on differential backscattering signals.  

 

Prior to joining JMIN, Dr. Reeves was a patent agent with Mintz P.C. in New York City, and a patent agent at SpencePC in Chicago. 

 

Dr. Reeves has more than 20 years of experience leading and managing biotechnology projects, and a track record of successfully conceptualizing, leading, and completing metabolic engineering research and development projects that provide a strong patent position and lead to commercial deployment. He has worked as a technical advisor and director on numerous research and development and intellectual property matters, both as an independent consultant and in-house for commercial operations.  Dr. Reeves spent nine years working in scientific and advisory positions at renewable bioenergy company Coskata, Inc., and eight years with biotechnology research and development company, Fermalogic, where he was a senior scientist, principal investigator, and later director of research and development. He also worked as a post-doctoral scientist in the Strain and Fermentation Development Group at Abbott Laboratories. 

 

Dr. Reeves earned a Doctorate and Master of Science in Microbiology at University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. He received a Bachelor of Arts in Biology at Queens College of the City in New York. He also is the inventor on 13 issued patents and seven pending applications. 

Education

  • Ph.D., Microbiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL

  • M.S., Microbiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL

  • B.A., Biology, Queens College, City University of NY, Queens, NY

Admitted to Practice

  • United States Patent and Trademark Office

Patents

  • U.S. Patent 9,790,522: Compositions and methods for the conversion of short-chain carboxylic acids and alcohols using Clostridial enzymes 

  • U.S. Patent 9,464,302: Methods for sustaining the viability of acetogens during a decrease or cessation of syngas flow

  • U.S. Patent 9,428,755: Use of novel methyltransferases for generating novel strains

  • U.S. Patent 9,284,528: Genes encoding key catalyzing mechanisms for ethanol production from syngas fermentation

  • U.S. Patent 9,045,760: Genes encoding key catalyzing mechanisms for ethanol production from syngas fermentation

  • U.S. Patent 9,045,758: Use of novel methyltransferases for generating novel strains

  • U.S. Patent 9,040,268: Method for controlling undesirable byproducts formation caused by contaminating organisms in the production of ethanol from syngas

  • U.S. Patent 9,034,617: Processes for the anaerobic bioconversion of syngas to oxygenated organic compounds with in situ protection from hydrogen cyanide 

  • U.S. Patent 8,987,431: Essential genes encoding conserved metabolic pathway function in autotrophic solventogenic Clostridial species

  • U.S. Patent 8,628,943: Genes encoding key catalyzing mechanisms for ethanol production from syngas fermentation 

  • U.S. Patent 8,551,746: Method for controlling undesirable by-products formation caused by contaminating organisms in the production of ethanol from syngas

  • U.S. Patent 8,039,239: Recombinant microorganisms having modified production of alcohols and acids

  • U.S. patent 7,638,306: Process of increasing cellular production of biologically active compounds

Pending Patents

  • U.S. Appl. No. 2014/680,195: Compositions and methods for the conversion of short-chained carboxylic acids to alcohols using clostridial enzymes  

  • U.S. Appl. No. 2014/812,182: Syntrophic co-culture of anaerobic microorganisms for production of n-butanol from syngas  

  • U.S. Appl. No. 2012/157,978:| Identification of contaminating bacteria in industrial ethanol fermentations

  • U.S. Appl. No. 2012/614,976: Process of increasing cellular production of biologically active compounds

  • U.S. Appl. No. 2012/468,456: Process of increasing cellular production of biologically active compounds  

  • U.S. Appl. No. 2011/466,364: Methods of increasing production of secondary metabolites by manipulating           metabolic pathways that include methylmalonyl-CoA

  • U.S. Appl. No. 2011/566,155: Methods of creating consumable strains and compositions thereof

Publications

  • Weber, JM, AR Reeves, R Seshadri, WH Cernota, MC Gonzalez, DL Gray, and RK Wesley.  2012. Biotransformation and recovery of the isoflavones genistein and daidzein from industrial antibiotic fermentations.  Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol.97(14):6427-6437.

  • Weber, JM, WH Cernota, MC Gonzalez, AR Reeves, and RK Wesley. 2012.  An erythromycin process improvement using the diethylmethylmalonate responsive (Dmr) phenotype of the Saccharopolyspora erythraea mutB strain.  Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 93:1575-1583.

  • Reeves, AR, R Seshadri, IA Brikun, WH Cernota, MC Gonzalez, JM Weber.  2008. Knockout of the erythromycin biosynthetic cluster gene, eryBI, blocks isoflavone glucoside bioconversion during erythromycin fermentations in Aeromicrobium erythreum but not in Saccharopolyspora  erythraea.  Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 74:7383-7390.  

  • Reeves AR, Brikun IA, Cernota WH, Leach BI, Gonzalez MC, Weber JM.  2006.  Engineering of the methylmalonyl-CoA metabolite node in Saccharopolyspora erythraea for increased erythromycin production.  Metab. Eng. 9(3):293-303.  

  • Reeves AR, IA Brikun, WH Cernota, BI Leach, MC Gonzalez, JM Weber.  2006.  Effects of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase gene knockouts on erythromycin production in carbohydrate-based and oil-based fermentations of Saccharopolyspora erythraea.  J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol. 2006 Jul; 33(7):600-609. 

  • Reeves, AR, WH Cernota, IA Brikun, RK Wesley and JM. Weber.  2004. Engineering precursor flow for increased erythromycin production in Aeromicrobium erythreum. Metab. Eng.  6: 300-312.

  • Brikun IA, AR Reeves, WH Cernota, MB Luu, and JM Weber.  2004. Organization of the erythromycin-biosynthetic gene cluster of Aeromicrobium erythreum.  J. Ind. Microbiol. Biotechnol.  31: 335-344.

  • Reeves, AR, RS English, JS Lampel, DA Post, and TJ Vanden Boom. 1999.  Transcriptional organization of the erythromycin biosynthetic gene cluster.  J. Bacteriol. 181: 7098-7106.

  • Reeves, AR, DA Post, and TJ Vanden Boom.  1998.  Physical-genetic map of the erythromycin-producing organism Saccharopolyspora erythraea. Microbiology 144: 2151-2159.

  • Reeves, AR, G-RWang, and AA Salyers. 1997.  Characterization of four outer membrane proteins that play a role in utilization of starch by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.  J. Bacteriol. 179: 643-649.

  • Reeves, AR, JN D’Elia, J Frias, and AA. Salyers.  1996.  A Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron outer membrane protein essential for growth on maltooligosaccharides and starch.  J. Bacteriol.  178: 823-830.

  • Cheng, Q, MC Yu, AR Reeves, and AA Salyers.  1995.  Identification and characterization of a Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron gene, csuF, which is essential for growth on chondroitin sulfate.  J. Bacteriol. 177: 3721-3727.

Email:      areeves@jmin-iplaw.com

Direct:     478.412.4701

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Johnson, Marcou, Isaacs & Nix, LLC ("JMIN") will collect names and email addresses from its visitors to be used solely to respond to questions regarding the services we offer and/or general intellectual property questions.  All personal data received (names and email addresses) shall be considered confidential and will never be sold to third parties.

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